rockefeller center in 1939
This is a collection of all the pages from a 1939 booklet, “The Story of Rockefeller Center”. It’s a tourist guide coinciding with the 1939 New York World’s Fair, and it covers the development, design and attractions of the building. In 1939, Rockefeller Center was only about nine years old, but it had gained a reputation as a cultural hot spot in New York City. The source of many of NBC’s radio broadcasts and home of the Radio City Music Hall, the building was known to millions of Americans. This booklet is an interesting time capsule.
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six gun territory ocala florida stage coach
When I was child in the 1980s, I used to visit my Grandmother in Ocala, Florida. An hour or so north of Orlando and it’s multitude of tourist attractions and themeparks, Ocala was fairly sleepy. Beautiful rolling horse land was the main attraction for a visitor. But that doesn’t mean there weren’t some vestiges of the old Florida tourist trade. Silver Springs and its natural wonder was of course the main draw for visitors, but I will never forget my visits to Six Gun Territory. I just recently stumbled across this collection of promotional photos at an estate sale and I wanted to share. It took me right back. Read on, and click the images for higher resolution.
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Outside a Burger King in the 1980s
Repost from November 2010. I found a trade journal put out by Prosperity International in 1984 called, “FLORIDA: In Shape for The Future”. It’s filled with all kinds of promotional materials for Florida companies. (Ironic note… it was printed in Japan. I guess there were no Florida printing companies that would pay for advertising?) In it I found some fun Burger King photos. I loved Burger King in the 1980s. Hell, I can’t help it, I still love it! Click photos to make larger.
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Personal Computers In the 1980s atari 800
From the 1980 J.C. Penney Christmas Catalog. Featured here is the Atari 800. With a whole whopping 16k of RAM. Holy mackerel, it’s monstrously huge! Looks like it was built into an IBM Selectric chassis.

Reposted from June 2011. This is a brand new selection of vintage personal computers in the 1980s from Department Store catalogs. As usual, I dug through the magnificent selection at Wishbookweb.com. Go there. Wait, finish looking at this post. THEN, go there.
As per usual, click the image to view the entire catalog page and a lot more cool imagery of Ye Olde Computers. More after the fold.

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I still have never been to Weeki Wachee, but it’s one of those old Florida attractions that I feel I have to see. It’s a shame, because I wasn’t far from there yesterday when my wife and I did a day trip for our eleventh anniversary.
Being in close proximity reminded me of the huge amount of Florida ephemera that I’ve collected. As I was going through it, I found this Weeki Wachee pamphlet. What I particularly love about it are the celebrity endorsements.
Click the image below to see the front and back of the pamphlet.

Arthur Godrey says, “Weeki Wachee is one of the Seven Modern Wonders of the World”.
Bob Hope says, “The live Mermaids are the greatest at Weeki Wachee… and it’s fun!”
Ted Mack says, “This is the finest underwater talent in the world.”
Don McNeil says, “What a thrill. What a joy. You’ll love the mermaids at Weeki Wachee!”
Weeki Wachee is still around today. If you’re visiting Tampa or nearby cities, it’s a great place to take in a little of that classic Florida tourist attraction nostalgia. Here’s their homepage.

This is just a small project I’ve been working on, for fun. Two of my heros. Still a work in progress.

I was going through some old backups today and I came across some images that took me back. In 1996, I was a founding member of the Triple Dub Club Cyberneighborhood. (WWW, three Ws, get it?) This was an online Disney community founded by a number of individuals from the Disney Fans Bulletin Board (DFBB) on Prodigy. Remember Prodigy? The Web was young, and we all thought we could create a truly interactive online neighborhood, themed around Disney history. It was a fun experiment, though it didn’t last very long. When Prodigy switched to a web based platform, the DFBB died.. It’s ironic, but while we were trying to create a web based environment, to build up our Disney fan community, as soon as the old ASCII based forums disappeared, our community sort of fell apart and so did the TDCC. Still, I’ll always remember that time fondly.
Here’s some of the graphics I created for the TDCC.

Triple Dub Club Cyberneighborhood. This was my first ever piece of graphic design. I created it entirely in Microsoft Paint. Thank goodness Photoshop eventually came into my life. Triple Dub Club Cyberneighborhood. This was my first ever piece of graphic design. I created it entirely in Microsoft Paint. Thank goodness Photoshop eventually came into my life. My handle on the Prodigy Disney Fans Bulletin Board was J. Thaddeus Toad. So when I created my own page for the TDCC, it only made sense to call it Toad Hall. My handle on the Prodigy Disney Fans Bulletin Board was J. Thaddeus Toad. So when I created my own page for the TDCC, it only made sense to call it Toad Hall. An animted gif of the Wedway Peoplemover that I created. This was to be the graphic that displayed when you were moving between themed sections of the TDCC. An animted gif of the Wedway Peoplemover that I created. This was to be the graphic that displayed when you were moving between themed sections of the TDCC.

Howard Johnson's Fudge Candy Wrapper Papercraft
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Click on the image above for a full sized PDF to print.
My first papercraft in a long time. Sorry you papercraft fans have had to wait so long! I’ll add several more before the Christmas.
This is a recreation of the Howard Johnson’s fudge bar from the 1950s. I don’t have a lot of information about either the candy or the dimensions of the wrapper, so I’m kind of leaving it to you to decide what to do with it.
My idea was to print it, wrap a piece of my own fudge in it and give it away as a stocking stuffer. Think of this as mini wrapping paper, for the retro candy lover.
If you print this page without shrinking or enlarging it, the wrapper will come out 7 by 5.2 inches. To completely cover a piece of chocolate, I would cut the candy to about 4 by 2 inches, keeping in mind that the thickness of the candy will also reduce coverage. If your candy is too thick, I’d cut it even smaller. Of course, you can always scale up the image and print it larger than what I’ve got here.
Have fun!

jelly babies doctor who art

“Would You Like A Jelly Baby?” – Original art by Jason Snyder.
An illustration I finished recently. I’ve been obsessed with retro candy packaging recently. This is the Jelly Babies packaging used during parts of the 1970s and 1980s. Also, I couldn’t help throwing references to the Tardis. My wife suggested that I indicate the tail end of Tom Baker’s scarf on the table. Maybe a 2.0 version of this, just for Who geeks.
This was done completely in Illustrator and Photoshop. No 3d software was used in the final composition, though I did use Sketchup to create the perspective reference.

This artwork is available as a printable digital download on Etsy.com. If you’re interested in framing it and hanging it on your wall somewhere, here’s where you can get it! It’s only $5 dollars, and you’ll receive access to five high resolution digital download sizes. You can print it yourself, or have it professionally printed and framed. You can even use it as a Windows wallpaper for your PC gaming rig, or your phone.

It’s been a while since I’ve added any Christmas paper art. And with the lovely feedback I’ve been receiving these past few weeks, I thought I’d add some more. This most recent batch is based on some mid-century Christmas snow boxes. Specifically, Ivory Snow and Boxed MICA flakes. Enjoy!